© 2017-2019 DOC Inc.​​

Examining Industries and Companies in Japan < Volume 2>

August 17, 2018

Examining Industries and Companies in Japan < Volume 1>

In the previous article, I mainly introduced the outline of industry analysis and corporate analysis and the method of analysis. In this article, we will introduce detailed contents of each industry.

 

Manufacturers

The key is the capacity to create a variety of products in a timely manner!

Manufacturers support the Japanese economy and Japan as producers of various goods. There are all sorts of manufacturer. They can be divided into many industries according to what they produce. For example, there are automobile manufacturers who produce cars, electronics manufacturers who produce TV sets, PCs, mobile phones, and other devices, and food manufacturers who produce instant noodles, snacks, beverages, etc. In addition to producing daily goods that are familiar to us, manufacturers also produce materials, such as lumber and iron, which are used to produce semi-conductors, electronic components, houses and automobiles.

Society has prospered and is now filled with goods of every type. Consumers desire products that are more convenient, have higher quality, and provide greater novelty. Development capacity is more important to individual manufacturers today as adding higher value has become the key to competitiveness.

 

Main Industry:

  • Food

  • Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries

  • Construction

  • Housing and interior design

  • Textiles, pulp, and paper

  • Chemicals and petroleum

  • Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics

  • Iron, steel, and mining

  • Metals and nonferrous metals

  • Rubber, glass, cement, pottery, and ceramics

  • Machinery and plant engineering

  • Electronic and electrical equipment

  • Automobiles and transportation equipment

  • Precision and medical equipment

  • Printing and office equipment

  • Other manufacturers

Main jobs and job types:

  • General affairs, human resources, and labor

  • Finance, accounting, and treasury

  • Legal affairs, screening, and patents

  • Clerk, secretary, and receptionist

  • Advertising and public relations

  • Research studies and marketing

  • Planning and product development

  • Corporate planning

  • Sales

  • Sales promotion and merchandising

  • Basic research

  • Applied research and technology development

  • Production and manufacturing technologies

  • Quality, production management, and maintenance

 

Trading Companies

Trading professionals connecting people with corporations and corporations with corporations

From buying and selling products at stores to purchasing oil, natural gas, or other energy resources, trading companies serve as channels between corporations and consumers, as well as between corporations.

There are two prominent types of trading company: general trading companies that handle diverse products ranging from ramen to airplanes, and specialized trading companies that only handle specific products, such as food, textiles, and fuel. The former feature comprehensiveness and the latter expertise. Each employs business know-how acquired through doing business globally. They also have an abundance of internationally minded human resources because of their partnerships with overseas companies. In addition to acting as business intermediaries, trading companies have broken into market development, business management, and other areas in recent years.

 

Main industries:

  • General trading companies

  • Specialized trading companies (agriculture, forestry, and fisheries)

  • Specialized trading companies (food)

  • Specialized trading companies (housing)

  • Specialized trading companies (textiles and apparel)

  • Specialized trading companies (pulp and paper)

  • Specialized trading companies (chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and petroleum)

  • Specialized trading companies (rubber, glass, and cement)

  • Specialized trading companies (iron, steel, and metals)

  • Specialized trading companies (machinery)

  • Specialized trading companies (electronic and electrical equipment, communication equipment, and game products)

  • Specialized trading companies (precision and medical equipment)

  • Specialized trading companies (printing, office supplies, and office equipment)

  • Specialized trading companies (sports and everyday items)

  • Specialized trading companies (education)

  • Mail order and Internet sales

Main jobs and job types:

  • General affairs, human resources, and labor

  • Finance, accounting, and treasury

  • Legal affairs, screening, and patents

  • Trade clerk and overseas clerk

  • Clerk, secretary, and receptionist

  • Research studies and marketing

  • Planning and product development

  • Corporate planning

  • Sales

  • Sales promotion and merchandising

 

Finance

Whether in surplus or shortage, the "lubricant of the economy" supporting Japan

The flow of products from production to consumption is called "distribution," and businesses that sell products to consumers are called "retailers."

The key to retailing is quickly understanding the constantly changing needs of consumers and accurately responding to them. Retailers include specialty stores, such as electronics retail stores, where special product knowledge and an extensive range of products are offered to provide a wide variety of selections. Retailers also include convenience stores, which have become the new retailing style, and mail order businesses that are growing rapidly through Internet sales. On the other hand, supermarkets and department stores, which have supported consumption in Japan since the period of rapid economic growth, are constantly facing the demand to develop new business categories and markets while they seek sales styles and methods meeting the needs of the times.

 

Main industries:

  • Department stores

  • Supermarkets

  • Convenience stores

  • Distribution and chain stores

  • Home centers

  • Consumer cooperatives

  • Drug stores

  • Specialty stores (general)

  • Specialty stores

  • (cameras and office automation)

  • Specialty stores

  • (glasses and precious metals)

  • Specialty stores (food)

  • Specialty stores (electrical equipment)

  • Specialty stores (fashion and clothing)

  • Specialty stores (automobiles)

  • Specialty stores (books and music)

  • Specialty stores (interior design)

  • Specialty stores (other retail)

  • Mail order

Main jobs and job types:

  • General affairs, human resources, and labor

  • Finance, accounting, and treasury

  • Legal affairs, screening, and patents

  • Clerk, secretary, and receptionist

  • Advertising and public relations

  • Planning and product development

  • Corporate planning

  • Sales

  • Sales promotion and merchandising

  • Pharmacist

  • Sales staff and attendant

  • Store manager

  • Supervisor

  • Buyer

 

Service

Providing intangible goods to create a prosperous life

"Services" is a financial term that refers to intangible goods, such as utility and satisfaction, which do not leave any commodities remaining after their sale or purchase. Businesses that handle such goods are called service industries.

There are many service industries in the world. For example, we use transportation and traffic services, such as trains and airplanes, and leisure services, such as amusement parks and movie theaters. If we want to eat delicious food, we use food services, such as restaurants and cafes, to relax. In addition, we use medical services when we are injured or sick. Service industries seek the convenience and satisfaction of consumers to make their lives richer.

 

Main industries:

  • Real estate

  • Transportation, distribution, and warehousing

  • Electricity, gas, and energy

  • Food services

  • Hotels, travel, and sightseeing

  • Medical, welfare, and care services

  • Leisure services

  • Consulting and research

  • Human resources and outsourcing

  • Education

  • Building management and maintenance

  • Security

  • Ceremonial functions

  • Beauty, cosmetics, and hair dressing

  • Agricultural cooperatives (including JA financial institutions)

  • Nonprofit, special, and independent, administrative institutions

  • Other services

Main jobs and job types:

  • General affairs, human resources, and labor

  • Finance, accounting, and treasury

  • Legal affairs, screening, and patents

  • Clerk, secretary, and receptionist

  • Advertising and public relations

  • Planning and product development

  • Corporate planning

  • Sales

  • Sales promotion and merchandising

  • MR

  • Pharmacist

  • Medical technician and nurse

  • Nutritionist

  • Welfare worker, care worker, and home helper

  • Nursery school teacher

  • Lecturer and instructor

  • Business consultant

  • IT consultant

  • Specialized consultant

  • Financial advisor

  • Translator

  • Interpreter

  • Sales staff and attendant

  • Buyer

  • Esthetician

 

Distribution and retailing

The architect of a consumer society connecting producers and consumer

The flow of products from production to consumption is called "distribution," and businesses that sell products to consumers are called "retailers."

The key to retailing is quickly understanding the constantly changing needs of consumers and accurately responding to them. Retailers include specialty stores, such as electronics retail stores, where special product knowledge and an extensive range of products are offered to provide a wide variety of selections. Retailers also include convenience stores, which have become the new retailing style, and mail order businesses that are growing rapidly through Internet sales. On the other hand, supermarkets and department stores, which have supported consumption in Japan since the period of rapid economic growth, are constantly facing the demand to develop new business categories and markets while they seek sales styles and methods meeting the needs of the times.

 

Main industries:

  • Department stores

  • Supermarkets

  • Convenience stores

  • Distribution and chain stores

  • Home centers

  • Consumer cooperatives

  • Drug stores

  • Specialty stores (general)

  • Specialty stores (cameras and office automation)

  • Specialty stores  (glasses and precious metals)

  • Specialty stores (food)

  • Specialty stores (electrical equipment)

  • Specialty stores (fashion and clothing)

  • Specialty stores (automobiles)

  • Specialty stores (books and music)

  • Specialty stores (interior design)

  • Specialty stores (other retail)

  • Mail order

Main jobs and job types:

  • General affairs, human resources, and labor

  • Finance, accounting, and treasury

  • Legal affairs, screening, and patents

  • Clerk, secretary, and receptionist

  • Advertising and public relations

  • Planning and product development

  • Corporate planning

  • Sales

  • Sales promotion and merchandising

  • Pharmacist

  • Sales staff and attendant

  • Store manager

  • Supervisor

  • Buyer

 

Information and communications Mass media

Providing intangible goods to create a prosperous life advances have a major impact on society with excellent market potential

The appearance and rapid progress of communications tools, such as mobile phones and the Internet, have made our lives significantly more convenient. We can now order what we want from online shops and use search engines to acquire a variety of information about things we want to know. You could say that this has all been made possible by innovative information technology (IT).

Telecommunications carriers are largely divided into two categories: primary telecommunications carriers with their own communication lines, and secondary telecommunications carriers that provide services using lines leased from primary telecommunications carriers.

In addition to simply designing software, the software industry has recently begun consulting services for their customers. Information and communications industries offer significant possibilities for new business opportunities and are expected to grow further.

The term "mass media" collectively refers to newspaper companies, news service agencies, publishers, broadcasters, advertising agencies, record companies, production companies, and freelance journalists. They communicate a large amount of information to a multitude of people. This characteristic of the industry has resulted in significant impact on opinion-making.

 

Main industries:

  • Software and information processing

  • Communications

  • Internet technologies

  • Communications business services

  • Data communications

  • Game software

  • Newspapers

  • Publishing

  • Broadcasting

  • Advertising

  • News service agencies

Main jobs and job types:

  • General affairs, human resources, and labor

  • Finance, accounting, and treasury

  • Legal affairs, screening, and patents

  • Clerk, secretary, and receptionist

  • Planning and product development

  • Corporate planning

  • Sales promotion and merchandising

  • Programmer

  • System engineer

  • System maintenance and operation

  • System consultant

  • Game creator

  • Announcer

  • Editing and production

  • Reporter and writer

  • Designer

Source : Job Hunting Guide for International Students | JASSO

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Good
Please reload

Featured Topics

Japanese Interview Attire Guide For Women

May 1, 2019

1/10
Please reload

New Topics
Please reload

Tags
Please reload

Social
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square
bannerclickittest.jpg